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Article
April 9, 1898

AN IMPROVISED APPARATUS FOR FIXING BLOOD-FILMS AT EXACT TEMPERATURES.

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS. MO.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(15):858-859. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440670046002m

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Abstract

The greatest of the many difficulties attending and complicating the study of hematology is the recognition and interpretation of the artefacts. Being a fluid, the blood with its corpusclar elements is more vulnerable than the rest of the tissues. This vulnerability manifests itself in response to mechanical and chemic injuries produced on the plasma, but especially the corpuscular elements in the course of the several modes of hardening or fixing the blood-film preparatory to the staining process.

Different methods, however slight the difference may be, will yield different pictures owing to the delicacy of the selective affinities of the constituent elements of the blood-corpuscles. By using chemicals such as alcohol, ether, or formol, as hardening agents, an element of uncertainty is introduced rendering results unreliable and ambiguous because of the possibility of existing impurities or variations in the percentage of water. The ideal hardening method is by heat. The disadvantage

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