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Article
September 1, 1900

GALL-STONES AND DISEASES OF THE GALLBLADDER AND NERVOUS SYMPTOMS RESULTING THEREFROM.

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI, OHIO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(9):541-542. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620350011001d
Abstract

Gall-stones have been found in the bile-duct; in the intrahepatic cells; in adventitious sacs; situated between the hepatic ducts; beneath the ampullæ, and in different portions of the intestinal tract. In subjects of 50 years of age and over they are not infrequently the exciting cause of cancer of the liver and its ducts. Almost as frequently do they cause intestinal obstruction after having ulcerated through and into the duodenum. They are foreign bodies from the intrahepatic cells to the rectal pouch, and are the only foreign bodies in the human economy concerning which many physicians and fewer surgeons persist in teaching the very dangerous doctrine of "hands off" until the resulting deathrate becomes a reflection on our art, worthy of our most serious consideration. Infection coming from the intestinal tract, through the duodenal door opening into the liver by way of the common duct, along with the entering of

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