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Article
September 1, 1900

THE PHYSIOLOGIC TRAINING OF THE FEEBLE-MINDED.

Author Affiliations

ELLICOTT CITY, MD.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(9):555-557. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620350025001i
Abstract

American institutions for the care and training of the feeble-minded are the results of a little more than a half-century of the work begun abroad by various observers in a semi-scientific manner, it being reserved for the elder Seguin, a student of Itard and Esquirol—the French pioneer workers—to formulate a system from dilettantism. The year 1848 saw the beginning in this country of Seguin's enthusiastic, brilliant work, inspiring American workers—a beginning that places Wilbur, Brown, Knight, Kerlin and Richards almost side by side with Seguin; that saw two institutions in as many states multiplied in 1900 to 19 state and 10 private institutions, caring for a total of nearly 8000 feeble-minded persons. It is true that Seguin's methods of training the feeble-minded are yet considered the best, being founded on the only true method of all teaching —the physiologic—the only system that takes cognizance of the individual and the only

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