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Article
September 1, 1900

THE FAUCIAL TONSILS AS POINTS OF ENTRANCE OF TUBERCULOSIS IN YOUNG CHILDREN.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(9):560. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460350030004
Abstract

The tonsils have been receiving a great deal of attention of late, because they are regarded as a possible and a probably rather frequent place of entrance of infections of various kinds. Diphtheria, scarlet fever, acute rheumatism, pyemia, and numerous other infectious diseases, all stand in more or less close relation to the tonsils. It has long been thought that tuberculosis— the most widespread of all infections—may gain entrance through the tonsils, especially in the young, in whom tuberculosis of the cervical glands is so common. Much has been written about this question, and its various phases have been quite fully discussed. Still, the subject can hardly be regarded as exhausted. Systematic studies on a large scale are best calculated to place the facts in regard to questions like this in their true light. Friedmann1 reports the results of an extensive investigation covering the tonsils of 91 children examined

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