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Article
September 1, 1900

SEPTICOPYEMIA, SIMULATING BUBONIC PEST, AND CAUSED BY AN ANAEROBIC BACILLUS.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(9):562. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460350032010
Abstract

There are but few anaerobic pathogenic organisms as far as we know, but it is very likely that instances of such infections escape recognition often because not examined systematically with the proper methods. One of the most interesting and important anaerobic bacilli, gifted with high pathogenic powers, is the gas bacillus of Welch. Since the attention was directed to the bacillus of Welch, the number of morbid conditions found to be caused by it have multiplied rapidly. This shows what may be the case in other forms of anaerobic infections. Courmont and Cade1 recently describe with great fulness of detail an exceedingly interesting example of an acute, fatal infection with an anaerobic bacillus that seems to be a new pathogenic organism. Clinically there was much that reminded one of the bubonic pest: violent general symptoms, ill-defined signs of pulmonary involvement with blood-tinged expectoration, subclavicular phlegmonous swellings. Pest was easily

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