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October 13, 1900

WHAT AMOUNT OF VISUAL DEFECT SHOULD DISQUALIFY IN RAILROAD SERVICE?

Author Affiliations

Professor Ophthalmology and Otology in Northwestern University Woman's Medical School; Professor Ophthalmology in Chicago Policlinic; Oculist and Aurist to St. Luke's St. Joseph's and Wesley Hospitals, etc. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(15):920-927. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620410004001a
Abstract

The title of this paper constitutes one of the unsettled points connected with the subject of the ocular and aural requirements of transportation employees. Considering the absolute lack of any such requirements whatsoever, obtaining in transportation circles, only a few years ago, it is quite surprising that so much progress has been made along these lines up to the present time. Only a few years ago, the quality of an engineer's eyes and ears was never brought into question, while now the importance of the health of these organs is a settled and incontrovertible fact. The cause of this revolution of sentiment is due to the persistent efforts of ophthalmologists, aurists and conscientious and capable railway surgeons. It must be admitted, however, that honest and sincere railroad officials have quite generally been reasonably quick to grasp the importance of the subject, and to realize the enormity of their own responsibility,

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