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Article
October 13, 1900

THE OCCURRENCE AND IMPORTANCE OF EOSINOPHILE CELLS IN THE BLOOD.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(15):951. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460410035003
Abstract

The literature contains many and contradictory statements in regard to the occurrence and the diagnostic value of the eosinophile cells. These cells are easily recognized because of the affinity of their protoplasmic granules for eosin and other acid stains; the staining methods are simple. In order to reach a definite opinion in regard to these cells, the numerous, irreconcilable hypotheses now in vogue must be overthrown so that further investigation may rest on well-established facts. Alfred Wolff1 has made a beginning in this work, and on account of the increasing importance of hematology in clinical medicine a brief review of his results may be helpful.

Numerous differential leucocytic counts show that in normal blood the percentage of eosinophiles varies from 1.5 to 2.5; 6 to 8 per cent, is surely pathologic. Excluding leukemia, there is a large number of diseases — cutaneous, nervous, respiratory, genito-urinary, and parasitic (trichinosis)—in which

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