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Article
May 28, 1892

CARBONIC ACID AN INDEX OF DANGER IN GIVING CHLOROFORM, AND HOW TO LESSEN THE DANGER.

Author Affiliations

OF BURLINGTON, IOWA.

JAMA. 1892;XVIII(22):668-669. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02411260010001d

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Abstract

We assume in this brief paper, from several analogies, that the activity of the respiration as shown by the amount of CO2 exhaled, is an index of danger in administering chloroform, and renders the production of anæsthesia more difficult.

Hence, we argue the comparative safety and ease of administration to weakly persons, and the danger and frequent difficulty to the mechanic.

For this reason doubtless its safety in military life has been much overrated.

The more muscle the more C02 generated, greater seems the danger, and greater the amount of chloroform required.

The latter statement is well proven in dogs and rabbits, they being chloroformed with much difficulty.

The majority of deaths from chloroform are probably superinduced by asphyxia, not, however, commencing in the lungs, as the older physiologists taught, but in the systemic capillaries.

We will consider the administration of chloroform, with respect to greater safety, under the conditions

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