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December 29, 1900

TREATMENT OF INJURIES TO THE URETERS.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Surgical Pathology and Clinical Surgery, Omaha Medical College; Surgeon to Immanuel Hospital, etc. OMAHA, NEB.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(26):1669-1671. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620520001001
Abstract

Feb. 22, 1900, Mrs. B. M., aged 38 years, housewife, with no children, reported that two months before, she began having morning nausea, and supposed she was pregnant, but menstruation continued. Thursday, February 15, one week before I saw her in consultation with Drs. Hoffman and Detwiler, what seemed to be a normal menstruation came to an end, and she felt perfectly well. The next morning she felt a sudden sharp pain in the lower abdomen, radiating toward the left side, and she had to lie down. A little more menstrual blood made its appearance, and she has had a slight flow ever since, but nothing has been found to suggest a miscarriage, and no decidual tissue has been discovered. Pain has been at times severe and cutting. Since February 18, Drs. Hoffman and Detwiler have seen her daily and her temperature has never been above normal, nor has her

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