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Article
January 12, 1901

THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF VALVULAR AND MUSCULAR LESIONS IN DISEASES OF THE HEART.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Therapeutics in the Philadelphia Polyclinic; Clinical Lecturer on Medicine in Jefferson Medical College; Physician to the Philadelphia and Rush Hospitals; Consulting Physician to the Jewish Hospital, etc. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(2):80-84. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470020008001a
Abstract

It would be incorrect to say that the importance of affections of the myocardium has been but recently recognized; yet it is probably true that the attention of teachers and authors has been much more actively given to these affections during the last four or five years, and that among physicians not engaged in teaching or writing, the subject, while not ignored, has not even yet received the attention it deserves.

One reason for this is that until recently, at least, in the didactic lectures, in the clinical lectures, in the ward classes, and in the quiz room, so much stress has been laid on the diagnosis of valvular lesions and the recognition of cardiac murmurs that the average student leaves college with the conception of valvular murmurs and heart disease as synonymous. In post-graduate teaching I have frequently had experienced men, as well as recent graduates, report that a

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