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Article
May 7, 1898

FIVE CASES OF SARCOMA OF THE HEAD AND NECK.

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(19):1098-1102. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440710030001g

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Abstract

Many times it falls to the lot of some practitioners to see in dental surgery cases of mistaken diagnosis which become interesting studies. The question may be asked, "is the mistake altogether the fault of the graduate in dentistry or due to insufficient opportunities?" In looking back we find the training of a dental student decidedly deficient in many branches, just as is true of the medical man. Take for example the subject of oral surgery. The general type of teacher is often the instructor or assistant to the professor of surgery in the medical department (if the institution belongs to a university), a man who has seldom done anything beyond the more common minor operations, who knows little or nothing of the needs of the dental surgeon, and who often regards the dentist as not needing to know much beyond a few minor surgical subjects, such as wounds, fractures

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