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Article
January 26, 1901

DISINFECTION OF THE URINE FROM CASES OF TYPHOID FEVER.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(4):261. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.02470040039004
Abstract

Even before the discovery of the typhoid bacillus and the establishment of its etiologic relations, it was appreciated that the intestinal discharges constituted an important agency for the transmission of the hypothetic virus of the disease. As time went on and bacteriologic knowledge increased, it became recognized that typhoid fever is not exclusively a disease of the intestinal tract, i. e., that its lesions are not confined to these structures; and, further, that the intestine may even escape. Alert and industrious investigators soon showed that typhoid bacilli are eliminated with the urine in a considerable proportion of cases of typhoid fever, sometimes in enormous number and generally in pure culture. The microorganisms do not, as a rule, appear in the urine until the second or third week of the disease, and when once present they may persist for long periods of time, even for years. The urine may exhibit little

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