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Article
January 26, 1901

THE CLUMPING OF BACILLI AND OF RED CORPUSCLES.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(4):264. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.02470040042014
Abstract

The essential importance of physico-chemical processes in biological phenomena is becoming more and more generally recognized. Indeed, it is along physico-chemical lines that we may look for satisfactory explanations of many phenomena in normal as well as pathological conditions, phenomena the existence of which is made clear, but not fully explained by studies of a morphological nature. And it is probably in this very field that the new century will witness the most far-reaching achievements in physiology and pathology. Sir Lauder Brunton's simple experiments1 illustrating the clumping of bacteria and the formation of rouleaux by red blood-corpuscles show well what a flood of light may be thrown on such phenomena when they are approached from the standpoint of physics and chemistry. If lucifer matches are covered with hard soap and thrown into a flat trough containing water they float about indifferently, but if the water is acidulated1 the artificial bacteria are

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