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Article
February 4, 1893

IDEAL SURGERY.Read before the St. Louis Medical Society.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR PRINCIPLES OF SURGERY AND C LINICAL SURGERY, WOMA MEDICAL COLLEGE; SURGEON TO THE WOMAN'S HOSPITAL; CONSULTING SURGEON TO THE ST. LOUIS CITY AND FEMALE HOSPITALS, ETC.

JAMA. 1893;XX(5):117-121. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420320007001a

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Abstract

Mr. President:—It is plainly apparent to the student of medicine that the practice of modern surgery is wholly unlike the practice which prevailed, and was approved, only a few years ago.

In the light of advanced surgical pathology, bacteriology, and the now more familiar processes of regeneration and repair, modern surgical methods bear but slight resemblance to those that were practiced a very short time ago.

It is furthermore clearly apparent that the whole tendency of modern surgery is to secure ideal results, and at the same time to keep the practice well abreast with the revolution necessitated by the indications discovered through intelligent clinical observation, scientific investigation and experimental research.

The scope of this modern ideal surgery—it may be emphatically stated at the outset—does not embrace a rule necessitating the adjustment of a class of cases to a certain mechanical device, in order to secure ideal results; but it

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