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Article
February 11, 1893

ON CERTAIN CONDITIONS IN REGARD TO THE INFECTIVE NATURE OF CARCINOMA.

JAMA. 1893;XX(6):163-164. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420330025007

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Abstract

In an address read before the Medico-Chirurgical Society of Glasgow, on October 7,1892, (British Medical Journal, Jan. 14, 1893), Dr. Joseph Coats presents his most recent views on the etiology of cancer. He proposes to analyze the characteristics of carcinomata in the same manner as tuberculosis was analyzed, and its infective nature proven, long before the discovery of the tubercle bacillus. According to this authority, Cohnheim's theory is satisfactory in explaining the origin of the benign (non-nulastatic) tumors, but it does not apply to carcinoma. The difference in the lesions of the infective granulomata and of cancer are pointed out, with the conclusion that the infective microbes produce homoplastic irritative tissue lesions, while carcinoma is a true tissue growth—a heteroplastic epithelial proliferation, well supplied with blood and lymph vessels and with connective tissue. The metastases of cancer are tissue growths of an elaborate and finely adjusted character which often reproduce

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