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Article
February 16, 1901

THE MAJOR OBSTETRICAL OPERATIONS.FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER WITH A TABULAR REPORT OF TWENTY-THREE CONSECUTIVE SUCCESSFUL CASES.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(7):415-420. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470070001001
Abstract

GENERAL PRINCIPLES.  The recent advances in the study of the contracted pelvis, and the possibility of saving fetal life in such cases, by the extension of the major operations to a wider field, have as yet been confined too exclusively to the practice of professed obstetricians, and too little popularized among the great mass of the profession; perhaps because it has been thought by manv that the technicalities involved in the detection of contraction are too great for the general practitioner's use, and probably because there is still too much credence for the former erroneous idea of the comparative scarcity of contraction in America. This belief must, however, now be given up. The results of all those who have recently investigated the subject having vielded about the same percentages of contraction, namely, about 11 per cent., if we except the negroes, in whom it rises to nearly 20 per cent.

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