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Article
February 23, 1901

THE IMPORTANCE OF AN EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF TUBERCULOSIS.

Author Affiliations

DENVER, COLO.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(8):486-490. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470080008001b
Abstract

The failure to recognize tuberculosis in its incipiency is the result of several causes: Tuberculosis has an insidious beginning. Most patients do not recognize the nature of their trouble until a [ill] is well established, and frequently when they consult a physician the disease is well advanced. The symptoms which belong to the incipient stage are not easy of recognition and are frequently misinterpreted by the examining physician. Many patients will not accept the facts until it is too late Many physicians fail to give the facts at this stage for fear of frightening patients.

These are the principal reasons why tuberculosis is frequently unrecognized until it is too late to hope for relief; and, also, furnish an explanation for the widespread belief that tuberculosis is incurable.

Before beginning to discuss the subject of the early recognition of tuberculosis it seems essential that some definite method of classification should be

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