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Article
March 2, 1901

APHASIA WITH LETTER-BLINDNESS, WITHOUT WORD-BLINDNESS; WITH RIGHT HEMIPLEGIA AND PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS.

Author Affiliations

Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia; Member of the American Neurological and American Climatological Associations; President of the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(9):550-551. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470090014002c
Abstract

I wish to make a brief record of a case of pulmonary tuberculosis with intercurrent hemiplegia of the right side and motor and sensory aphasia, with letter-blindness, but not word-blindness. The patient is a physician and a member of the faculty of a well-known institution. He is now 35 years of age; he had pneumonia sixteen years ago, and had a slight attack again two years ago. His tubercular infection is probably now of about four years' duration. At the beginning of the year 1899 both lungs were infiltrated; the right, generally consolidated. The fingers were clubbed.

January, 2, 1899, he had a sudden paralysis involving the right face, arm and leg. It was apparently simultaneous throughout this distribution, and did not extend from one area to another. There was a short period of unconsciousness. I saw him the next day at the request of Dr. D. D. Stewart, of

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