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Article
March 2, 1901

RECENT VIEWS CONCERNING THE GENESIS OF CARCINOMA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(9):575. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.02470090039004
Abstract

Ribbert's opinions as to the early participation of the underlying connective tissue in the development of carcinoma have been the subject of a severe arraignment by Lohmer.1 For a considerable period, chiefly through the work of Thiersch and Waldeyer, the origin as well as the further growth of carcinoma was held to be directly due to the proliferation of the epithelium into the deeper tissues. Ribbert and his pupils diverged from this conception in that they traced the origin of the tumor to a disconnection of the epithelial cells from their associates by processes in the subepithelial connective tissue; following such dislocations, the loosened cells proliferated to form a tumor. Such severances are, according to Ribbert, produced by the growth of the connective tissue into the epithelium, by the lengthening of the papillæ of the corium so that the interpapillary epithelial pegs become correspondingly drawn out and ultimately separated,

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