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Article
May 14, 1898

HYPERKINESIS OF THE MUSCLES OF MASTICATION A SYMPTOM AND AN ETIOLOGIC FACTOR IN NERVOUS AFFECTIONS: PARTICULARLY NEURALGIA OF THE TRIGEMINUS AND DISEASES OF THE JAW.

Author Affiliations

DULUTH, MINN.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(20):1162-1164. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440720026001h

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Abstract

Kinetic action or movement is recognized in contradistinction to trophic action, signifying growth and structural change, and indicates, in greater or less degree, an expenditure of nerve muscular action, implying also an expenditure of nerve force. This within the limit of natural involuntary muscular action implies a corresponding increase of trophic action conducive to the condition of health and development, but if the nerve stimulus be over excited or too long continued, whether by some exciting cause directly affecting portions of the brain or spinal cord, by a state of general excitement known as a nerve storm, excessive voluntary action, or in any other manner extreme muscular activity be induced, there is an arrest of structural development and thus trophic action ceases with a corresponding loss of vitality and substance. Having these simple facts in mind it is easy to understand why localized symptoms of brain lesion should be, as

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