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Article
June 17, 1893

GOLD; WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO ITS CLINICAL APPLICATION.

JAMA. 1893;XX(24):656-658. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.12420510006001a
Abstract

Pharmacology.—The only form in wrhich gold is officinal is that of the so-called double chloride of gold and sodium, a combination of equal parts of the two salts, the compound corresponding to 32.4 of the metal. Auric chloride, though itself soluble in water, is not well absorbed. The dose of the chloride of gold and sodium may be stated as from 1/50 to 1/10 grain.

The bromide has been employed, but has the disadvantage of being a less soluble salt than the double chloride. The bromide may be given in daily doses varying from 1/10 to ⅙ grain. The cyanide of gold has also been used. This salt is a yellowish crystalline powder devoid of taste, insoluble in water, alcohol and ether. The dose of the cyanide is 1/50 to 1/10 grain.

Physiological Action.—Concentrated preparations of gold have an escharotic effect when locally applied. When taken internally in small doses

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