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Article
April 20, 1901

A STUDY IN THE HEMATOLOGY OF NEURASTHENIA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(16):1107-1109. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470160025002h
Abstract

The title neurasthenia would seem to cover a pathologic condition far more widespread than the term itself might indicate. There is scarcely an organ or tissue in the body which does not show more or less deviation from the normal.

In taking up its hematology, facts appear which of themselves are confusing and contradictory. One of the first symptoms noticeable in neurasthenia is the evident, anemia or, if not anemia, hemic change. In an able and suggestive article published in the Medical Record, June 25, 1898, Mary Putnam Jacobi points out that many neurasthenics, and also patients evidently anemic, have a very high blood count, and gives the history and count of several patients where the reds were over 5,500,000. One patient, a palid neurasthenic, had a red count of 6,660,000; whites, 37,777. Following suggestions of Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, Dr. J. K. Mitchell has made a very careful and

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