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Article
April 27, 1901

HOSPITAL CARS FOR RAILWAY SERVICE.

Author Affiliations

CHIEF SURGEON OF THE LEHIGH VALLEY R. R. SOUTH BETHLEHEM, PA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(17):1179-1181. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470170025001h
Abstract

The end of the nineteenth century exhibits marked improvement in the means of alleviating suffering and for saving life. The sick and wounded in the last two wars have had furnished them life-saving appliances and means of transportation never dreamed of in former times. Public sentiment is so exercised in the matter of efficient attention to the needs of the sick and wounded in warfare that it is astonishing that people think or do so little in ordinary civil life in the matter of efficient first aid and comfortable transportation for the much larger number of persons who suffer injury on our railroads. The Interstate Commerce Commission shows that, in round numbers, there were 51,743 railroad casualties to persons in the year just ended. There were 7123 fatalities and 44,620 injuries. The total casualties to the British army in the war in South Africa, up to date, amount to about

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