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Article
June 11, 1898

THE ANCIENT AND MODERN INSTRUMENTS USED IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF DISEASES OF THE ESOPHAGUS AND STOMACH.

Author Affiliations

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND LECTURER ON DISEASES OF THE STOMACH AND INTESTINES, DENVER UNIVERSITY, MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. DENVER, COLO.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(24):1390-1393. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440760018002d
Abstract

The stomach and esophagus remained a terra incognita with reference to the diseases they are subject to as long as these organs remained inaccessible to direct examination and the application of local remedial measures. The invention of an instrument that possesses both diagnostic and therapeutic virtues has thrown much light into these obscure regions of the human anatomy. The instrument which now supplies the want felt for centuries is the stomach tube. This insignificant looking piece of rubber tubing, which has found a place in the armamentarium of every modern physician, was not born in a day. Like every other instrument, the stomach tube has a history.

History of the stomach tube.  —The origin of the stomach tube is shrouded in mystery. Who was the first to dare insert an instrument into the esophagus and down into the stomach for some definite purpose we do not know. Was it necessity

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