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Article
May 18, 1901

MENIERE'S DISEASE WITH REPORT OF A CASE.

Author Affiliations

GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL. PORTLAND, ORE.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(20):1382-1384. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470200022001e
Abstract

In 1861 Ménière published, in the Gazette Médicale de Paris, a description of a group of symptoms which thereafter, when noted, received the name of Ménière's disease. The symptoms in general were progressive deafness, varyingly constant vertigo, tinnitus aurium and gastric disturbances. Since then cases have been reported at times on both sides of the Atlantic, but principally in Europe, and pathologic investigations have been made. The result, however, has been more or less discordant, principally in admission of a distinct disease with symptoms as described, and additionally in the exact nature and location of the lesion or lesions.

Thus Burnett1 denounces the name of Ménière's disease as unjust and unscientific, defending his assertions by the fact that Flourens, in 1822, and Deleau,2 in 1836, described aural vertigo more accurately than Ménière in 1861, Deleau being especially entitled to credit, as he located the disease in the middle

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