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Article
May 18, 1901

A CASE OF ACUTE DERMATITIS CAUSED BY THE USE OF A HAIR-DYE HAVING FOR ITS BASE THE HYDROCHLORATE OF PARAPHENYLENE DIAMIN.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(20):1389-1390. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470200029001h
Abstract

On Jan. 30, 1901, Mrs. A. G., aged 44, married, a native of Venezuela, was referred to me by Dr. W. H. Haskin, suffering with a severe attack of dermatitis of the face, and a pruriginous, papulo-vesicular eruption on her arms and thighs. The forehead was swollen, red and shiny, with a few small vesicles near the margin of her hair. The eyelids, especially the upper, were puffy, the conjunctivæ slightly congested, the ears red and swollen; along the upper margins were numerous small vesicles filled with straw-colored fluid, which in places had exuded and formed granular crusts resembling "brown sugar." The nose and cheeks were slightly swollen. There was no eruption on the neck or chest, but the flexor and extensor surfaces of the forearms, and the anterior and inner sides of the thighs presented numerous small, slightly elevated papules, mostly perifollicular, and a few vesicles. The arms and

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