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Article
June 8, 1901

THE PROGRESS AND TENDENCY OF HYGIENE AND SANITARY SCIENCE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.ORATION ON STATE MEDICINE BEFORE THE FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AT ST. PAUL, MINN., JUNE 4-7, 1901.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF HYGIENE, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY. WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(23):1617-1626. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470230019002b
Abstract

Hygiene is a department of medicine whose object is the preservation and promotion of health and deals, therefore, with all the factors likely to influence our physical welfare. It is not an independent science, but rather the application of the teachings of physiology, chemistry, physics, meteorology, pathology, sociology, epidemiology and bacteriology to the maintenance of the health and life of individuals and communities. The subject is very properly divided into personal and public hygiene. In the former the doctrines are applied to individuals, in the latter to communities and states.

This branch of medicine has received such an impetus within the last few decades that many persons regard it of modern origin; such, however, is not the case, for on turning to early history we almost invariably find that the health of the population has been made a subject of legislation. Hygiene was practiced by the Egyptians, the old Indians

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