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Article
June 22, 1901

ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AND ALLIED STATES.

Author Affiliations

FELLOW OF THE CHICAGO ACADEMY OF MEDICINE. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(25):1758-1766. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470250012002
Abstract

Scurvy is a disease characterized by simple inflammation of the gums which gradually becomes chronic and deep-seated, and extends throughout the alveolar process causing its absorption and exfoliation of the teeth. This disease has passed under various designations: salivation, bromidism, plumbism, iodism, pyorrhea alveolaris, phagadenic pericementis, ptyalism and interstitial gingivitis. These terms merely define local manifestations in connection with other symptoms. The term interstitial gingivitis defines the precise pathologic change which occurs in the tissues.

Pathologic material for the study of scurvy in man is obtained with such difficulty in the recent state as to necessitate research upon animals. As the first step in investigation, two practitioners of comparative medicine, with an extensive hospital practice, were consulted as to the frequency of this disease in animals. All animals under their care suffered from it more or less, but 80 per cent. of dogs over 8 years of age had the

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