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Article
July 20, 1901

THE STUDY OF LARYNGOLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY AND IN THE HIGHER MEDICAL EDUCATION.CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS, DELIVERED BEFORE THE SECTION ON LARYNGOLOGY AND OTOLOGY, AT THE FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AT ST. PAUL, MINN., JUNE 4-7, 1901.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(3):158-161. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470290004001a
Abstract

Instead of making the usual report on the year's progress in the specialty, I will depart from the prescribed routine and call attention to a subject which is of vital importance both to the laryngologist and to the profession at large. At the outset I wish it to be distinctly understood that I shall speak only of undergraduate instruction in schools of the very first rank, and not of the more elaborate training of the postgraduate for special work.

The study of laryngology has been grossly neglected in the medical schools of this country and Europe. It is either omitted entirely from the schedule of studies or, in many colleges at least, it is taught in a superficial, perfunctory sort of way that neither inspires faith in the instructor nor interest in the student.

Although the catalogue often tells in glowing terms of a course on laryngology, such a course

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