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August 3, 1901

THE DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS BETWEEN MILD DISCRETE SMALLPOX AND CHICKEN-POX.

Author Affiliations

ST. PAUL, MINN.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(5):305-307. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470310011001d
Abstract

There are probably no other diseases, surely no other contagious diseases, so commonly mistaken one for the other as is the case in smallpox and chicken-pox. The error is seldom made of calling chicken-pox anything else than what it is, while some physicians are loth to acknowledge smallpox by its right name. They prefer instead to call it pustular syphilis, acne, bromism, chicken-pox; they go out of their way, seemingly, for names like Cuban itch, Philippino rash, yaw, etc. It is quite remarkable how persistent we have been that smallpox must be something else. It would look as though the profession had fairly forgotten about the discrete form of this disease. Physicians, as well as laymen, may have pictured in their minds the repulsive confluent or hemorrhagic variety to the exclusion of the milder kind.

Discrete smallpox is sometimes so extremely light, that medical men who have formed their conceptions

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