[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 17, 1901

TWO CASES OF SUPPURATION OF THE PAROTID GLAND WITH PUS IN THE EXTERNAL AUDITORY CANAL.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Diseases of the Ear in the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine; Aurist to the Out-Patient Department of the Pennsylvania Hospital. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(7):450. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470330032001h

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The two cases which I desire to report possess interest from the fact that in each case there was considerable difficulty in eliminating suppurative otitis media as the cause of pus in the auditory canal. Both cases were children, and the presence of the pus may be accounted for by infiltration through the incisuræ Santorini. Of course, this has often been known to occur, but I think the cause is frequently overlooked by the general practitioner, or those who have not made a special study of the subject, the pus being regarded as coming from the middle ear.

Case 1.  —The patient was a boy, white, aged 9 months. The mother, who brought the boy to the dispensary of the Pennsylvania Hospital, said that the child's father had syphilis. Examination showed a large gummatous mass involving the parotid gland and tissues surrounding it and in front of the auricle. The

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×