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Article
September 21, 1901

THE AIM OF MEDICAL EDUCATION, AND ITS RELATION TO RESEARCH WORK, BY MEDICAL STUDENTS.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Pediatrics, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Chicago (Medical College of the University of Illinois); President of the American Pediatric Society. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(12):736-738. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470380006001a
Abstract

The work of the medical colleges twenty years ago was such that almost any change in it was a change in the direction of improvement. The result was that as changes were suggested, they were hailed with delight, and adopted as rapidly and as thoroughly as the different schools could accommodate themselves to them, until it has now almost become a habit to accept as good and desirable any innovation in medical college work which may be suggested. The last two decades have seen a general extension of the time of medical study from two courses of five months each to four courses of eight or nine months each; this period has seen introduced into the curriculum many branches of study, previously never attempted; it has seen the standard of admission raised, and the requirements for the degree, and for the right to practice made more stringent. During the same

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