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Article
September 28, 1901

CIRCULATORY DISTURBANCES ACCOMPANYING HEPATIC CIRRHOSIS: AND INOSCULATION OF THE PORTAL BRANCHES WITH THE SYSTEMIC VEINS.

Author Affiliations

Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, University of Buffalo; Attending Physician, Buffalo General Hospital. BUFFALO, N. Y.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(13):817-820. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470390017001c
Abstract

In typical atrophic cirrhosis of the liver—the cirrhosis of Laennec—the most striking clinical features are those related to the disturbances in circulation. The obstructed portal radicals and consequent distension of the portal vein, the raising of the blood pressure in the portal vessels, the resulting congestion of the abdominal viscera, and the development of ascites are familiar manifestations. In a paper, read before this Section at the Newport meeting, in 1889, I ventured to express some views connected with this subject, which did not meet with the approval they seemed to me to deserve, and I, therefore, purpose reviving these views on this occasion.

RELATION OF PORTAL TO GENERAL CIRCULATION.  When one considers the anatomy and physiology of the portal system of veins, it is apparent that nature seeks to prevent the entrance of portal blood into the general circulation, except by passage through the liver. The inosculations of the

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