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Article
July 16, 1898

THE PRESENT STATUS OF VACCINE AND VACCINATION.

Author Affiliations

ASSISTANT HYGIENIC LABORATORY U. S. MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE (A BUREAU OF THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT).

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(3):115-118. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450030017001d

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Abstract

It will not be attempted in this article to go into a historical résumé of vaccination, but it may be profitable to discuss briefly the relation existing between smallpox and vaccinia. Since the beginning of this century, numerous experiments have been made to determine whether they are distinct diseases with interchangeable immunity, or whether vaccinia is an attenuated smallpox obtained by its passage through an animal of greater resistance. Gassner in 1801, Sunderland in 1828, Thiele in 1836, Ceely about the same time, Babcock in 1840; and later experimenters such as Voight, Fischer, Haccius, Eternod, Copeman and Klein have all been able in one or more cases to produce vaccine by passing variolous material through cattle. Probably King of Madras, 1891 or 1892, has reported the most striking results, in which more than 400,000 persons were vaccinated with lymph thus produced, without reverting in any particular to its origin—smallpox. Frequently

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