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Article
October 26, 1901

ARTIFICIALLY PREPARED FOODS, THEIR NUTRITIVE VALUE AND DIETETIC APPLICATION.

Author Affiliations
Consulting Gastro-enterologist, Harper Hospital; Formerly Professor of Comparative Physiology, University of Pennsylvania: Member of American Physiological Society. DETROIT, MICH.
JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(17):1094-1100. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470430018001d
Abstract

The history of the scientific production of artificially prepared foods, like that of the subjects of digestion, nutrition and metabolism, is nothing more than a summary of the achievements of the experimental sciences relating to general biology and the science of medicine.

Investigation of the various empiric dietetic systems, from the time of Aristotle up to the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century, shows that, while various grain decoctions, ptisan, almond, egg and sugar-water and probably a few other dietetic preparations were used for invalids, no preparation existed which might lay claim to being an artificially prepared food in the sense that the term is used to-day. Far reaching and revolutionary were the discoveries which ushered in the birth of the exact knowledge of nutrition and dietetics!1 On the one hand we had the discovery of oxygen by Priestly and Scheele in 1774, and

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