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Article
November 16, 1901

INJURIES, FEIGNED AND REAL, WITH THEIR DIFFERENTIATION AND MEDICOLEGAL ASPECT.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(20):1295-1298. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470460009001d
Abstract

Injuries may be divided into two classes: 1, those with visible signs and symptoms; 2, those with invisible symptoms. Injury to certain tissues produce evidences of molecular change which usually justify the signs present and the symptoms complained of. A solution of continuity in either soft or bony parts requires no inductive or exclusive process of reasoning for their detection. Injuries to the nervous system productive of distinct objective symptoms, motor disturbances or discoverable sensory manifestations, do not tax the examiner's ingenuity to draw conclusions. Injuries to the nervous system, non-productive of objective symptoms in which the examiner is compelled to depend entirely upon subjective symptoms to arrive at the truth, are the most trying types the physician has to cope with. The invisible symptoms are the sensory, such as pain and the paresthesia. The visible symptoms and signs are chiefly motor and atrophic. Without repeating unnecessary detail as to

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