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Article
November 23, 1901

TWO DIFFERENT WAYS IN WHICH YELLOW FEVER MAY BE TRANSMITTED BY THE CULEX MOSQUITO—STEGOMYIA TAENIATA.

Author Affiliations

HAVANA, CUBA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(21):1387-1389. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470470029001h
Abstract

Had it been known in 1881 when I reported my first inoculations with contaminated mosquitoes, that eight or ten drops of blood from a yellow fever patient injected under the skin of a non-immune would almost surely produce an attack of the disease, as Dr. Reed and his colleagues have now clearly proved, my discovery of the transmission through the bite of the culex mosquito would have been considered quite plausible.

My experiments would have been taken up and repeated under more satisfactory conditions, the number of mosquitoes required in order to produce a characteristic reaction would have been ascertained, and, probably, twenty years of ignorance on that important subject would have been spared to the medical profession. Without stopping to discuss the nature of the specific germ, the bare knowledge of the fact that the prick of a needle, previously moistened with the lymph of a smallpox or varioloid

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