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Article
November 23, 1901

TREATMENT OF RINGWORM OF THE SCALP IN INSTITUTIONS.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(21):1389-1391. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470470031001i
Abstract

The hospital or institution which escapes the misfortune of having to care for cases of ringworm of the scalp has much for which to be grateful. Many such cases occurring in private practice, among properly cared for children of good physique and robust health are, if the disease is at all recent, usually rapidly responsive to well-advised measures. Not so with hospital and institution cases. Even in private practice observation shows that in cases of any duration the disease is frequently rebellious and persistent, and that in many instances the practitioner pronounces the cases cured when the hair has begun to fill in in the affected area or areas; whereas, in reality the disease may still persist in a less conspicuous but chronic state, and the case remains an active center of contagion for other children. In almost all institutions in which children with this disease are admitted or in

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