[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 30, 1901

THE INDICATIONS FOR OPERATION IN CALCULOUS NEPHRITIS AND URETERITIS.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(22):1451-1453. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470480021002e
Abstract

Recent advances in the diagnosis of calculus conditions of the kidneys and ureters show that more than half the calculi that originate in the kidneys pass into the ureters before they occasion sufficient symptoms to make their presence known. This increased frequency of ureteral calculi, which a more accurate method of diagnosis has shown, and the numerous small calculi that are passed with but slight symptoms, make it probable that many such calculi remain throughout life in the urinary tract, neither producing notable symptoms, nor interfering with the function of the kidneys.

Although these calculi may remain quiescent in the ureter and give rise to no functional derangement, they may, on the contrary, entirely destroy the function of one kidney without the recognition of the fact by the patient. The onset of calculous anuria, especially unilateral anuria, so closely mimics in symptomatology the process of recovery, that the integrity of

×