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Article
December 14, 1901

THE VALUE OF EXCISION OF THE SUPERIOR CERVICAL SYMPATHETIC GANGLION IN GLAUCOMA.

Author Affiliations
Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology, Post-Graduate Medical School; Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology in College of Physicians and Surgeons. CHICAGO.
JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(24):1588-1590. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470500016002f
Abstract

The history and modus operandi of this operation, as well as its intended and desired range of purpose, are all familiar to you, hence these points do not merit repetition here.

In order to obtain as complete American statistics as possible, the writer has sent out several hundred question blanks to men of repute and experience. However, the returns are a trifle meager, yet of such great importance on account of their uniformity, that a fair and just estimate may be had as to the real merits of the operation in question. There have been only 14 operations performed in America for glaucoma; in addition, several have been done for optic atrophy and Basedow's disease. If there are any more operations for glaucoma the writer has failed to get the report, though every effort was made to obtain same.

First, let us take a brief review of the physiology of

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