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Article
January 11, 1902

INJURIES OF THE CHOROID, WITH REPORT OF CASE.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(2):84-85. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480020014001e
Abstract

Injuries of choroid per se, with the exception of rupture, are so rarely seen, in fact it is so nearly impossible for them to take place without involvement of other ocular structures, that they can simply be alluded to as a possible occurrence. Small foreign bodies may pierce the sclerotic or the cornea and lens, and lodge in the choroid, and can often be detected there with the ophthalmoscope, and incised wounds of the sclerotic very frequently involve the choroid to a greater or less extent.

Hemorrhage into the choroid and retina may produce extensive changes in these membranes and impair the sight materially if the macular region is affected. Oliver1 reports an interesting case where a boy was struck in the eye with a stone. Shortly after the injury both choroidal and retinal hemorrhages were detected. Later pigmentary and atrophic changes took place and vision was reduced to

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