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Article
February 15, 1902

THE EFFECT OF GASTRIC JUICE UPON TUBERCLE BACILLI.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(7):463-464. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.02480070029006
Abstract

Apropos of the recent vigorous discussions regarding the possibilities of infection of the human organism by the bacillus of bovine tuberculosis the question of the effect of the gastric juice upon the tubercle bacillus becomes of particular interest. It is admitted that if man is infected by bacilli from cattle the infection is generally alimentary, from foodstuffs, rather than respiratory as in human contagion, and hence infecting organisms must be subjected to the antiseptic digestive fluids for at least some time. As early as 1883 this subject was considered, first by Falk, who found that caseous materials exposed for some time to the action of an artificial gastric juice were still capable of infecting guinea-pigs. Wesener found that tuberculous sputum mixed with artificial gastric juice and injected into the cecum of a rabbit produced tuberculosis at that point. Straus and Wurz found that prolonged action of artificial gastric juice upon

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