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Article
February 15, 1902

FARM COLONIES AND TENT LIFE FOR THE TUBERCULOUS.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(7):464-465. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.02480070030008
Abstract

A great deal has recently been said and written about sanatoria for tuberculous persons, and regarding the value of open air and light in the treatment of such patients. Freudenthal1 advocates what appear to be practical means, by which many tuberculous patients might be placed in very favorable conditions upon "farming colonies." The colony would be established upon a large farm, which has a favorable location as to climate. The buildings could be inexpensive, and a large part of the year could be spent in tents, which mode of life is beneficial in itself. Norman Bridge2 called attention in our pages to the fact that most of the climatic benefit that comes to this pathetic class of patients is due to their ability to live practically out of doors a large part of the time, night and day. The patients could help to place such an institution upon

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