[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 22, 1902

AN EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL RESEARCH INTO COCAIN AND EUCAIN.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(8):491-499. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480080001001
Abstract

EFFECT ON PERIPHERAL NERVE TRUNKS.  The injection of eucain or cocain into a nerve trunk so as to place all its structures in contact with the drug produces an effectual physiologic "block." By the word "block" is meant such condition of the nerve that neither afferent nor efferent impulses can pass, the conductivity being as completely interrupted as if the nerve were divided. While general anesthesia prevents the appreciation of pain and the production of voluntary motion, it does not prevent such other afferent impulses as those caused by mechanical, thermal or electrical stimulation of the nerve endings or trunks, which produce changes in the frequency and the amplitude of the respirations, in the frequency and force of the heart beats, and in vasomotor action. Either eucain or cocain injected into a nerve trunk as above described prevents the passing of such afferent impulses, thereby preventing effects upon the respiration,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×