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Article
March 8, 1902

THE ROLE OF CERTAIN NON-GRANULAR AND GRANULAR SOMATIC CELLS IN INFECTION.TECHNICS—THE ORIGIN, SIGNIFICANCE AND FATE OF THESE MORPHOLOGIC ELEMENTS.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(10):633-636. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480100009002a
Abstract

It very rarely happens that these cells can be studied with advantage without proper fixation and staining. Indeed, with our present knowledge, it may be said that it is impossible to recognize some of them in the fresh state, and their study in this condition does not, therefore, seem of sufficient importance to take up any of our time on the present occasion.

Whenever we wish to make studies of cells it is always a matter of the highest importance that the tissues be as fresh as possible, since many of the more delicate morphologic constituents of these bodies immediately begin to undergo alteration following death, and this process continues until they undergo complete disintegration. Fortunately for us, however, in this connection it is as a rule the case that we are more particularly concerned with the protoplasmic portions of the cells, and as these do not undergo such rapid

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