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Article
March 15, 1902

CASE OF BROWN-SEQUARD'S PARALYSIS, FROM STAB IN THE CERVICAL REGION, WITH COMPLETE HEMIPLEGIA, CROSSED MONOPLEGIA AND CROSSED TOTAL HEMIANESTHESIA.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(11):685-690. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480110003002
Abstract

I am indebted for the full, accurate and careful history to Dr. Tiecken, lately senior of the Cook County Hospital resident staff.

The patient was admitted July 10, 1900, after having been stabbed twice in the neck by an Italian compatriot during an argument. He fell, lost consciousness and remembered nothing till his arrival at the hospital in an ambulance.

Previous history: No previous injury nor illness.

Family history is negative.

Personal history: Patient admitted a venereal sore, not followed, however, by secondaries, but denied gonorrhea, although some slight urethral discharge was noted. Smoked and drank moderately.

Examination.  —Middle-aged, male, of short stature, well nourished, florid complexion and anxious expression; mind was usually clear but at times slightly delirious. Head and scalp were negative. There was no evidence of violence, no edema. Skull was negative; no evidence of fracture; no tenderness.Neck: One inch to the right of the median

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