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Article
March 15, 1902

ACUTE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.REPORT OF A RARE CASE OF PROBABLE SYPHILITIC ORIGIN.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(11):707-708. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480110029002d

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Abstract

No graver condition to which the human subject occasionally falls a victim will ever confront the practitioner of medicine than acute intestinal obstruction. His resources, medical and surgical, will be taxed to their utmost. Should it be the reduction of an invagination, the untwisting of a volvulus, severing adhesive bands, intestinal resection and end-to-end anastomosis, enteroplasty or enterotomy, in fact resorting to any surgical procedure for the relief of the existing condition, the high mortality from all these essentially capital operations renders this subject one well worthy of our consideration.

The usual causes of obstruction in the alimentary canal, while familiar to us all, may with propriety be recalled, as follows: Impaction of fecal matter, foreign bodies in the canal, intussusception, volvulus, constriction by bands usually following a peritonitis, openings in the omentum or mesentery through which the intestine falls and becomes constricted, diverticula, neoplasms, stricture and hernia. Grund, Saurel,

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