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Article
August 20, 1898

THE ASEPTIC ANIMAL SUTURE: ITS PLACE IN SURGERY.

Author Affiliations

BOSTON, MASS.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(8):381-387. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450080007001a
Abstract

Modern surgical technic differs in such a marked degree from the methods of even a recent period, that it is not a wonder that great differences of opinion still exist in regard to many questions pertaining to the treatment of wounds. For the present, at least, certain conditions of fundamental type may be accepted as settled, so far as the theory, or ideal, aimed at is concerned; for example, a wound made in aseptic, well-vitalized tissues, and maintained aseptic will be followed by primary union. It is not my present purpose to discuss the methods for maintaining a wound aseptic only so far as pertains to its closure and subsequent protection.

In any considerable wound it is necessary to occlude blood vessels and rejoin the separated structures. This must be done by the use of ligatures and sutures. The material best adapted for this purpose is the subject of the

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