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Article
August 20, 1898

SOME RECENT OBSERVATIONS UPON ACUTE INFLAMMATION OF THE PROSTATE GLAND.

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(8):400-402. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450080026001f

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Abstract

I selected my topic, even at the risk of promulgating but few new ideas and as well, no doubt, of going over much ground that you are already familiar with.

Anatomy of the gland.  —In brief, the prostate gland in structure as well as in function is rather a muscle than a gland, composed chiefly of unstripped muscular fibers, and has an inner or circular layer which is continuous in front with those surrounding the membranous urethra and behind with the muscular coat of the bladder. The outer layer beneath the fibrous capsule forms a sheath for the gland, while beneath them the glandular structure is imbedded, or, according to Park, the prostate, its utricle; the dilated extremities of the vasa deferentia (called ampulla), and the seminal vesicles are, like the uterus and tubes of the female, enclosed in a thin fibrous sheath, which he has called the broad ligament

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