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Article
April 5, 1902

A SERVICE VIEW OF HERNIA.ITS PREVALENCE AMONG OUR TROOPS IN THE ORIENT.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(14):871-873. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480140017001c

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Abstract

With the exception of gunshot wound, hernia is the commonest surgical condition that confronts the military surgeon in the Philippines. Among our troops in the Orient it develops as a tropical disease, and is now a condition to be reckoned with just as much as dysentery or typhoid fever. For while it rarely kills, it incapacitates. It puts men out of action, and so out of the service. With the immediate increase in our standing army and the thousands of raw recruits that will soon be ordered to foreign service, the importance of this subject will be greatly augmented, consequently the consideration of the question may not be inapropos at this time.

Unfortunately, there are at hand no definite statistics which will show the percentage of hernias among our troops in the tropics; but a very correct estimate of the prevalence of this surgical condition may be deduced from the

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